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Final Fantasy Retrospective: The Super Famicom Years

We continue our journey with the "Golden Age" of Final Fantasy

Welcome to the second part of our exhaustive look at the history of Final Fantasy! In the first edition, we looked at the birth of a role playing series that would go on to capture the hearts and minds of millions of gamers worldwide and the man behind that idea-Hironobu Sakaguchi. This time we move into the 16 bit era, a time when the Final Fantasy franchise truly took its place on the world stage of RPGs. So please join us as we delve into the Super Famicom Years.

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Comments

Angelo Grant Staff Writer

12/21/2012 at 04:42 PM Reply | Permalink | Report

And now I want to go play FF V.

I don't remember though if characters stats grew differently in that game depending on which class they were a-la FF Tactics, or if they were static. I seem to remember even from the start choosing specific characters to train is specific roles, but I don't know why I did. Oh well.

Aboboisdaman

02/24/2013 at 07:49 PM Reply | Permalink | Report

I've never beaten FF 4 on snes. The last boss is utterly insane. My brother beat him once when all of his characters were on level 96. Talk about a TON of grinding lol. There's a lot of things I love about FF 4. Kain is awesome. The music. When Palom and Porum (or whatever) turn into stone. I think it's funny how everybody dies so many times and always comes back. Man who would have thought that the ATB system originated from a formula one race?

Julian Titus Reviews Editor

02/24/2013 at 07:54 PM Reply | Permalink | Report

FF IV is by far my favorite in the series. Jesse think I'm insane, but I own every American version of the game, and will probably collect the Japanese ones at some point. If you think Zeromus was hard on SNES, you should have tried him on the PSX version from the FF Chronicles set. I've beaten that game more than any RPG and still had to bow out from that fight.

Surfcaster

02/25/2013 at 03:44 PM Reply | Permalink | Report

FF VI is my favourite game of all time. I still tend to play it yearly or bi-yearly. I'm gearing up to playing it again this year, but this time the GBA version on my Gameboy Player. Can't wait.

Again, these articles are fantastic!

Julian Titus Reviews Editor

02/25/2013 at 10:40 PM Reply | Permalink | Report

Thanks a lot! That really means a ton to me. I worked really hard on these things, and it was a true labor of love. Thanks for reading!

SanAndreas

02/25/2013 at 10:44 PM Reply | Permalink | Report

Final Fantasy VI was my entry point to the FF series (as FFIII on SNES). I loved it. FFVII is my favorite video game of all time, though.

In recent years, I've begun to appreciate FFV more and more. A lot of Americans dismiss it because of its weak narrative structure and the fact that we never got to play it until long after the SNES was dead and buried, but it really is an incredible game with memorable characters and a good battle system. The music is among the most memorable in the series even if it lacts the dramatic flair of either FF4 or FF6.

The Japanese in particular loved it. I think FF5 is probably the most-loved of the 16-bit FF games in Japan.

transmet2033

02/28/2013 at 10:51 AM Reply | Permalink | Report

I absolutely love FF iv.  I have started it a dozen or so times and have gotten through various points before having to give it up.  Sadly have not beaten it, yet.

The Last Ninja

04/11/2013 at 01:19 AM Reply | Permalink | Report

Wow, great article. FFVI is an absolutely stunning game! I have never managed to beat it, but I will play it again and again until I do. And Locke is the best!

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