Forgot password?  |  Register  |    
User Name:     Password:    
Review   

Supremacy MMA: Unrestricted Review


See PixlBit's Review Policies

On 04/15/2012 at 11:08 PM by Nick DiMola

Didn't you know that you can only knock out your opponent to win an MMA match?
RECOMMENDATION:

Not Recommended

If you’re going to create a game based on a specific sport, you usually want to make sure it’s replicated properly. Real MMA matches revolve around brutal submissions and painful, high intensity fights, but this is not the case with Supremacy MMA Unrestricted. Here, things are slow moving and tap-outs are impossible, as you merely chip away your opponent’s life bar until you knock them out. Furthermore, despite the varying disciplines of the sport, each and every fighter plays nearly the same, with the exception of grapple-based fighters who are at a distinct advantage. With its inaccurate portrayal and unbalanced roster, you’ll quickly find that Supremacy MMA Unrestricted is not only a bad MMA game, but a bad fighting game as well.

Upon starting story mode - which tells the brutal back-story of each combatant - I chose a fighter whose style matched my own. My fighter, being a master of Karate, should easily be able to compete; after all, it’s a fighting style that encourages defensive maneuvers and explosive attacks at the ideal moment. However upon starting the match, it became clear that he was nothing but weak. Punches didn’t land with any amount of force, kicks fell flat, and for some odd reason, grapple moves were the only ones to make an impact. Given that Karate is not a sport based on grappling, this truly made no sense. My opponent, a wrestler, was clearly very good at grapples and he defeated me without breaking a sweat.

It was at this point I realized that it was time to switch away from my Karate master and move instead to a wrestler. Lo and behold, in my next match, I wiped the floor with my opponent. Not only did I take him down fast, but I took him down without losing much life in the process. After figuring out the solution to victory, the rest of the game was simply a matter of spamming the grapple move.

Even if you choose to ignore grapple-based fighters and focus on the game’s core controls, you’re bound to find issues. It’s a very stiff fighting game, so you need to be in tune with the underlying rhythm in order to execute attacks. You also need to be on your toes in order to reverse and block enemy attacks, as they too are constantly on the offensive. Because you have such a small window of time to react, this can be particularly tough, and the consequences for missing a key button press are high.

Before moving to a wrestling character, I was convinced Supremacy MMA Unrestricted was actually impossible. Computer-controlled enemies are much better than you and will execute their full move set during any given match. Without any means of making someone tap out, there’s very little strategy involved, as you must merely figure out your fighter’s most effective moves and execute them as frequently as possible. Latency issues also hamper online play, so there’s no opportunity to eschew fighting the computer and enjoy the game exclusively among friends using a custom rule set.

There’s truly very little to appreciate in Supremacy MMA Unrestricted. It’s an experience with a broken underlying implementation of the sport and severe balance issues that invalidate a large portion of the roster. If you're looking for a game in which you can only wrestle to win, buy a wrestling game - there’s no reason to suffer through this unfulfilling experience. 

Review Policy

In our reviews, we'll try not to bore you with minutiae of a game. Instead, we'll outline what makes the game good or bad, and focus on telling you whether or not it is worth your time as opposed to what button makes you jump.

We use a five-star rating system with intervals of .5. Below is an outline of what each score generally means:


All games that receive this score are standout games in their genre. All players should seek a way to play this game. While the score doesn't equate to perfection, it's the best any game could conceivably do.


These are above-average games that most players should consider purchasing. Nearly everyone will enjoy the game and given the proper audience, some may even love these games.


This is our middle-of-the-road ranking. Titles that receive three stars may not make a strong impression on the reviewer in either direction. These games may have some faults and some strong points but they average out to be a modest title that is at least worthy of rental for most.


Games that are awarded two stars are below average titles. Good ideas may be present, but execution is poor and many issues hinder the experience.


Though functional, a game that receives this score has major issues. There are little to no redeeming qualities and should be avoided by nearly all players.


A game that gets this score is fundamentally broken and should be avoided by everyone.


 

Comments

Anonymous

04/20/2012 at 03:59 PM

This  game just sucks incase you dont know it or get it. wake up.

Log in to your PixlBit account in the bar above or join the site to leave a comment.

Support

Hot Story

Stranger Things 3: The Game Review

Like so many other children of the ‘80s, I love Stranger Things. Booting it up is like taking a time machine back to my childhood. The pervasive synth music, the wardrobes and the cultural references instantly transport me, making it easier to get sucked into the day-to-day of Hawkins and the ever-creepy world of the Upside-Down. And just like a true ‘80s property, there’s also a tie-in video game to go along with the latest season of the show. Thankfully this tie-in isn’t quite as low budget as as the Atari 2600 and NES tie-ins of yesteryear, but the dungeon crawling brawler pales in comparison to the electrifying viewing experience offered by the show, especially this latest season.

Read More...